Wink Hub a great concept, but fails at execution.

We started turning to home automation a couple of years ago when the Nest Thermostat entered the market. It was our first acquisition. Not long after that, we began adding in Belkin WeMo Switches. The Phillips Hue bulbs came next and then we added in the Nest Protect. Over the winter, we pulled in the Chamberlain MyQ Garage. This summer, we installed a pair of Dropcam Pros and then a Doorbot. Finally, we just recently got a August Smart Lock for our front door. Needless to say, there are a lot of individual products that require a lot of individual apps. We’ve been very happy with the products and how much simpler they have made our daily lives, but we continue to be a bit weighed down with the sheer amount of steps we have to go through to make them all work. This specific reason is why we were so happy to find out about the Wink home automation system.

Wink2Wink has quickly been making a name for itself in the home automation space. With more and more products appearing within home automation, companies like Wink are creating hubs to control all smart devices under one roof. The hub is a box that measures approximately 6 x 6 inches. All that is required to operated the Wink Hub is a wi-Fi network, the Wink app and of course, product compatible to Wink. The hub works with Wi-Fi, Z-wave, ZigBee and Bluetooth frequencies.

Set-up of the Wink up is easy. You simply plug it in and start up the app. Within a few minutes, the insturctions in the app walk you through connecting it to the Wi-Fi network and get you started on connecting your devices. Once the hub is up and running, you simply use the Wink app to identify the products on your network. This was where we ended up running into problems. As I metioned, we have several products in our home that would work with WInk. Unfortunately, we had issues with the Phillips Hue products and the MyQ Garage staying connected and identified within the Wink app.

Wink1When we acquired the Wink Hub, we also got two GE Link connected LED bulbs. These should have had the least problems connecting since they are packaged together. Unfortunately, they seemed to have the worst problems. We installed the bulbs into our hallway light and not only were they heavy, but they seemed to become warm very quickly. One bulb would connect fine, but the second one wouldn’t. It was as though only one Link bulb could be connected at a time. I’m sure this wasn’t the case, but that was how the software and hardware was behaving. .

After numerous attempts and several days of testing to try and get our system and products jiving with the Wink Hub, we finally decided to return the product. Even though the concept was fantastic, and at some point we’d love to have a central hub controlling all of our smart, home automation products, it doesn’t seem like Wink is the correct system for our home.

The Wink Light and Monitor kit, which includes 4 Link LED Bulbs, the Wink Hub and a Quirky Smart wIndow/Door sensor retails for $150.00 from WInk. Some of the companies that are partnered with Wink include: Philips, Nest, Bali, Kwikset, Chamberlain, Lutron, Dropcam, GE and Honeywell.

For more information on the Wink system, visit wink.com. You can purchase the Wink Hub via Amazon.

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